IV Bars Are the Trendy New Way to Treat a Hangover. But Do They Work?

hangover iv therapy

If you’ve ever had too much to drink you know the next morning, a hangover can be a miserable reminder. Your tongue feels thick and furry, your head hurts and your stomach churns. People have time-tested remedies for curing the dreaded hangover including rest, water, Tylenol and even the Chinese buffet. Now, a few enterprising doctors want you to know you have another choice, IV Hydration. And, you don’t even have to go to a hospital to get it.

If you get squeamish around needles, particularly if they’re in your arm, you’ll probably just want to continue your Saturday morning tradition at the Chinese buffet, but if you don’t mind a little stick and you’re willing to shell out $119 – $150, this might be for you. During treatment, customers are hooked up to IV bags that contain saline solution, vitamins and other, “wellness” ingredients.

In Las Vegas, Florida, New York and other cities across the US, hydration bars have become the trendy go-to for curing not only the feelings of malaise and dehydration that come from a hangover, but also the common cold. The concept is so popular in Las Vegas, a bus called Hangover Heaven boasts that it’s served more than 20,000 patients since its inception.

hangover heaven bus

In New York, IV therapy is popular in many wellness spas because it promises to treat a number of ailments including sunburn, exhaustion, and poor nutrition.

As this craze increases across busy urban landscapes, it is not without its critics. Doctors say it’s important to remember that any time you’re allowing someone access to your veins, there are a whole host of dangers including redness and swelling of the area, infection and potential allergies to the IV “cocktail.”

Many health professionals caution that there is no scientific data to support that the benefit of IV therapy is worth the exorbitant cost. In fact, some experts think that making it too easy for people to cure their hangovers is downright irresponsible. “Hangovers are nature’s little wrist slap,” said Michael Roy, executive director of Clearview Treatment Programs in Los Angeles. “It’s helpful for people to experience the negative effects of their drinking so they do not repeat excessive drinking episodes.”